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Wozniak reduced the number of chips by 50, by using RAM for the brick representation.Too complex to be fully comprehended at the time, the fact that this prototype also had no scoring or coin mechanisms meant Woz's prototype could not be used. Jobs told Wozniak that Atari gave them only 0 and that Wozniak's share was thus 0 (equivalent to

Wozniak reduced the number of chips by 50, by using RAM for the brick representation.Too complex to be fully comprehended at the time, the fact that this prototype also had no scoring or coin mechanisms meant Woz's prototype could not be used. Jobs told Wozniak that Atari gave them only $700 and that Wozniak's share was thus $350 (equivalent to $1,888 in 2016).

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Wozniak reduced the number of chips by 50, by using RAM for the brick representation.

Too complex to be fully comprehended at the time, the fact that this prototype also had no scoring or coin mechanisms meant Woz's prototype could not be used. Jobs told Wozniak that Atari gave them only $700 and that Wozniak's share was thus $350 (equivalent to $1,888 in 2016).

Wozniak's Apple I was similar to the Altair 8800, the first commercially available microcomputer, except the Apple I had no provision for internal expansion cards.

With expansion cards the Altair could attach to a computer terminal and be programmed in BASIC. Wozniak's design included a $25 microprocessor (MOS 6502) on a single circuit board with 256 bytes of ROM, 4K or 8K bytes of RAM, and a 40-character by 24-row display controller.

,888 in 2016).

Steve Wozniak was introduced to Jobs by friend Bill Fernandez, who attended Homestead High School with Jobs in 1971.

Together they sold some of their possessions (such as Wozniak's HP scientific calculator and Jobs' Volkswagen van), raised

Steve Wozniak was introduced to Jobs by friend Bill Fernandez, who attended Homestead High School with Jobs in 1971.

Together they sold some of their possessions (such as Wozniak's HP scientific calculator and Jobs' Volkswagen van), raised $1,300, and assembled the first boards in Jobs' bedroom and later (when there was no space left) in Jobs' garage.

Wozniak's apartment in San Jose was filled with monitors, electronic devices, and some computer games Wozniak had developed. (Wozniak later said he had no idea about the relation between the number and the mark of the beast, and "I came up with [it] because I like repeating digits.") Jobs and Wozniak sold their first 50 system boards to Paul Terrell, who was starting a new computer shop, called the Byte Shop, in Mountain View, California.

Apple's first computer lacked a case, power supply, keyboard, and display, all components the user had to provide.

During the design stage, Steve Jobs argued that the Apple II should have two expansion slots, while Wozniak wanted six.

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Steve Wozniak was introduced to Jobs by friend Bill Fernandez, who attended Homestead High School with Jobs in 1971.Together they sold some of their possessions (such as Wozniak's HP scientific calculator and Jobs' Volkswagen van), raised $1,300, and assembled the first boards in Jobs' bedroom and later (when there was no space left) in Jobs' garage.Wozniak's apartment in San Jose was filled with monitors, electronic devices, and some computer games Wozniak had developed. (Wozniak later said he had no idea about the relation between the number and the mark of the beast, and "I came up with [it] because I like repeating digits.") Jobs and Wozniak sold their first 50 system boards to Paul Terrell, who was starting a new computer shop, called the Byte Shop, in Mountain View, California.Apple's first computer lacked a case, power supply, keyboard, and display, all components the user had to provide.During the design stage, Steve Jobs argued that the Apple II should have two expansion slots, while Wozniak wanted six.

,300, and assembled the first boards in Jobs' bedroom and later (when there was no space left) in Jobs' garage.

Wozniak's apartment in San Jose was filled with monitors, electronic devices, and some computer games Wozniak had developed. (Wozniak later said he had no idea about the relation between the number and the mark of the beast, and "I came up with [it] because I like repeating digits.") Jobs and Wozniak sold their first 50 system boards to Paul Terrell, who was starting a new computer shop, called the Byte Shop, in Mountain View, California.

Apple's first computer lacked a case, power supply, keyboard, and display, all components the user had to provide.

During the design stage, Steve Jobs argued that the Apple II should have two expansion slots, while Wozniak wanted six.